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Macaron Mania

15 February 2010 1,620 views 6 Comments

Do you think it’s dumb that I didn’t know that macarons existed until a couple weeks ago? Not macaroon, macaron!

A macaron is a French almond-based meringue sandwich filled with flavored ganache. The macaroon we typically see in the U.S. are made with coconut and is heavy and dense.

macarons

Macarons from La Boite

La Boite, the awesome new coffee shop housed in a refurbished shipping container on South Lamar began serving macarons the week before the Tasty Up trailer tour.

That day we reveled, oohed and aahed in the salted caramel and chocolate with strawberry cream flavors.

mia_macaron

Mia

I went back to buy a dozen macarons to bring to our friend David and Meredith’s house for dinner. While pricey (almost $2 each), the macarons were a special treat that everyone loved and were the perfect size for little Mia.

La Boite was out of the strawberry cream ones but they did have caramel fleur de sel, maple pecan, strawberry chocolate, and chocolate espresso ganache.

While the macarons are made in La Boite’s production kitchen, thanks for many of the delicacies, including the  amazing almond croissants and ham and cheese croissants, goes to Barrie Cullinan, former pastry chef at Enoteca and Vespaio.

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  • DiningInAustinBlog

    Your post reminds me of something I heard the other day on NPR. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?st

  • jodibart

    That's awesome. I was totally thinking that macarons are the next cupcakes. I saw some at Inoteca Vespaio today but they were called macaroons. Now I'm thoroughly confused!

  • jodibart

    That's awesome. I was totally thinking that macarons are the next cupcakes. I saw some at Inoteca Vespaio today but they were called macaroons. Now I'm thoroughly confused!

  • Katie

    I heard macaron whose name is derived from an Italian word “maccarone” meaning paste. And I am still wondering the difference between a macaron an macaroon..

  • Katie

    I heard macaron whose name is derived from an Italian word “maccarone” meaning paste. And I am still wondering the difference between a macaron an macaroon..

  • Katie

    I heard macaron whose name is derived from an Italian word “maccarone” meaning paste. And I am still wondering the difference between a macaron an macaroon..